Click here for PDF Edition

2017-04-21 digital edition

ABOUT US   |   ADVERTISE   |   DEADLINES   |   PR INFO   |   SUBMIT   |   DELIVERY   |   CONTACT US  |  FEEDBACK
TODAY in the Jewish World:

Click on logo for link:



Click on logo for link:

The Jewish Press of Tampa and the Jewish Press of Pinellas County are Independently- owned biweekly Jewish community newspapers published in cooperation with and supported by the Tampa JCC & Federation and the Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties, respectively. Copyright © 2009-2018 The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc., All Rights Reserved.


 

April 21, 2017  RSS feed
Culture

Text: T T T

Museum exhibit chronicles attempt by Nazis to eradicate homosexuality


Cover of the September 1931 issue of “The Island,” a magazine for homosexuals, edited by Martin Radzuweit. Although illegal, homosexuality was generally tolerated in pre-Nazi Germany, particularly in urban areas. Some 30 literary, cultural and political journals for homosexual readers appeared during the Weimar era. Cover of the September 1931 issue of “The Island,” a magazine for homosexuals, edited by Martin Radzuweit. Although illegal, homosexuality was generally tolerated in pre-Nazi Germany, particularly in urban areas. Some 30 literary, cultural and political journals for homosexual readers appeared during the Weimar era. The Florida Holocaust Museum’s newest exhibition,Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals 1933-1945,” will open Sunday,April 30 at 10 a.m.

The exhibit examines the Nazi regime’s attempt to eradicate homosexuality, which left thousands dead and shattered the lives of many more.

Between 1933 and 1945, the German regime promoted racial health policies that sought to eliminate all sources of biological corruption to its dominant “Aryan” race. Among the groups persecuted as threats to the national health were Germany’s homosexual men. Believing them to be carriers of a “degeneracy” that weakened society and hindered population growth, the Nazi state arrested and incarcerated in prisons and concentration camps tens of thousands of German men as a means of terrorizing them into social conformity.

A 1907 political cartoon depicting sex-researcher Magnus Hirschfeld, ‘Hero of the Day,’ drumming up support for the abolition of Paragraph 175 of the German penal code that criminalized homosexuality.A 1907 political cartoon depicting sex-researcher Magnus Hirschfeld, ‘Hero of the Day,’ drumming up support for the abolition of Paragraph 175 of the German penal code that criminalized homosexuality.
An opening reception for the exhibit will take place Thursday, May 4 at 6:30 p.m. and include a lecture by Erik Jensen, a specialist in the history of Germany, gender and sexuality.

Jensen is an associate professor of history at Miami University of Ohio, where he teaches courses in German history and directs the honors program. He has written numerous articles about the pink triangle, which was used by the Nazis in concentration camps to identify and shame homosexuals, and on how the Nazis persecuted homosexuals.

His talk is part of the Pardoll Family Lecture Series. The reception is free to museum members and $9 per person for general admission. RSVP by calling (727) 820-0100, ext. 301.

The museum is located at 55 Fifth St. S., St. Petersburg. For additional information on the exhibit, visit https://www.TheFHM.org/explore-2/exhibits/nazi-persecution-of-homosexuals. The exhibit was produced by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.


Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Click ads below for larger version