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2016-12-02 digital edition

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The Jewish Press of Tampa and the Jewish Press of Pinellas County are Independently- owned biweekly Jewish community newspapers published in cooperation with and supported by the Tampa JCC & Federation and the Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties, respectively. Copyright © 2009-2018 The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc., All Rights Reserved.


 

December 2, 2016  RSS feed
Culture

Text: T T T

Ordained Reform rabbi to share spiritual journey to Chabad in Clearwater talk


Rabbi Burt Aaron Siegel Rabbi Burt Aaron Siegel The Jewish community is invited to hear Rabbi Burt Aaron Siegel, an educator and spiritual leader, speak on Thursday, Dec. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Tabacinic Chabad Center, 2280 Belleair Road, Clearwater.

The speech will include the story of his spiritual journey.

Admission to the presentation is $10 for adults or $15 for couples and sponsorships are available. Reserve online @ www.JewishClearwater.com or by calling (727) 265-2770.

Rabbi Segal is a descendant of Ger Chassidim – his great-grandfather a Ger Hasidic rabbi in Poland – but in the 1900s Rabbi Siegel’s grandparents and mother came to America and soon gave up traditional Yiddishkeit. Rabbi Siegel, a native of Milwaukee, was the first generation born in America, and knew only about secular Jewish culture.

Seeking Hashem in a way that was to fully emerge only decades later, Rabbi Siegel’s life, from childhood, was focused on experiencing Jewishness. At age 6, when he had an almost mystical experience while at a synagogue for the first time, he knew he was destined to be a rabbi.

He graduated from the Reform rabbinic school, Hebrew Union College- Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati, and for a while held a faculty position there. He has also served as rabbi at a variety of locations and continued his spiritual journey. In time he formed his own congregation, the Shul of New York, growing from a handful of people to more than 1,000.

Still searching, he explored Eastern religions but in time he returned to Judaism, studying under Rabbi BenTzion Krasnianski. He is now fully immersed in Jewish traditionalism and in Chabad has found his spiritual home.


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