Click here for PDF Edition

2014-05-23 digital edition

ABOUT US   |   ADVERTISE   |   DEADLINES   |   PR INFO   |   SUBMIT   |   DELIVERY   |   CONTACT US  |  FEEDBACK
TODAY in the Jewish World:

Click on logo for link:



Click on logo for link:

The Jewish Press of Tampa and the Jewish Press of Pinellas County are Independently- owned biweekly Jewish community newspapers published in cooperation with and supported by the Tampa JCC & Federation and the Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties, respectively. Copyright © 2009-2018 The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc., All Rights Reserved.


 

May 23, 2014  RSS feed
Front Page

Text: T T T

Torrent of hateful tweets unleashed after Israeli win

Staff & Wires


Thousands of Maccabi Tel Aviv fans celebrate in Rabin Square in Tel Aviv after the Israeli team won in the Euroleague finals, but the victory also drew thousands of anti-Semitic rants on social media. 
Photo by Amir Levy/Flash90 Thousands of Maccabi Tel Aviv fans celebrate in Rabin Square in Tel Aviv after the Israeli team won in the Euroleague finals, but the victory also drew thousands of anti-Semitic rants on social media. Photo by Amir Levy/Flash90 In the wake of Maccabi Tel Aviv’s upset win over Real Madrid in the Euroleague basketball finals on May 18, an estimated 18,000 anti-Semitic Spanish tweets were posted.

The tweets, many using the hashtag #putosjudios (f******gJews), included statements such as “F****** Jews. This didn’t happen under Hitler,” “F****** Jews... they should stick you all in an oven. F******BASTARDS!” and “F****** Israel and f****** jews. I have always said that and I’ll carry on saying it,” reported Haaretz.

The Jewish community in Catalonia, Spain, plans to file a legal complaint on the tweets. The planned lawsuit will identify five people as responsible for many of the anti-Semitic tweets, according to the Spanish newspaper El Pais.

“I am a firm defender of freedom of expression, but there must be a limit,” said Jai Anguita, president of Bet Shalom, the name for the Jewish community of Barcelona.

“We could say that these comments come from the high spirits after a [sporting] defeat, that they are almost jokes....But history has shown us where these jokes can lead,” Anguita said. “Some of them talk about sending Jews to a gas chamber. We cannot allow for this to snowball; we need to stop giving the impression that incitement to hatred is permitted.”

Maccabi Tel Aviv expressed shock and disappointment over “the rush of anti-Semitism,” with general manager Danny Federman, noting that the team’s trademark yellow was actually chosen in 1940s as a sign of solidarity with the Jews persecuted by the Nazis and forced to wear a yellow star.

“We are proud to wear colors that symbolize unity, togetherness and respect for all peoples,” he said.

The Euroleague finals in Italy drew huge interest in Israel, with an estimated 10,000 Israelis traveling to Milan — most wearing yellow — and thousands of others spilling out into Rabin Square in Tel Aviv to celebrate the 98-86 overtime victory.

This was Maccabi Tel Avi’s first Euroleague title since 2005.


Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Click ads below for larger version