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The Jewish Press of Tampa and the Jewish Press of Pinellas County are Independently- owned biweekly Jewish community newspapers published in cooperation with and supported by the Tampa JCC & Federation and the Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties, respectively. Copyright © 2009-2018 The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc., All Rights Reserved.


 

March 14, 2014  RSS feed
Front Page

Text: T T T

Tampa man has personal connection to documentary

By BOB FRYER Jewish Press


From the movie, “Lost Town,” which tells the story of Trochenbrod, a Jewish town virtually wiped out by the Nazis. The father of Tampa resident Sam Bulmash was one of the few to escape. The documentary will be shown during the Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival, March 20-31. From the movie, “Lost Town,” which tells the story of Trochenbrod, a Jewish town virtually wiped out by the Nazis. The father of Tampa resident Sam Bulmash was one of the few to escape. The documentary will be shown during the Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival, March 20-31. Before Germany invaded Poland in 1939, the entirely Jewish town of Trochenbrod, surrounded by forests and farmlands, was a thriving community.

Then, in 1942, Nazis obliterated the town, executing all but a handful of residents who escaped. Thousands of victims were buried in mass graves in the nearby forests.

After years of visiting the area (now part of western Ukraine), tracking down survivors to hear their stories about life in Trochenbrod, and searching archives for photos of what the town was like before it was wiped out, filmmakers released Lost Town in 2013. It is among a dozen movies featured during the 18th annual Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival which runs from March 20-31. The film festival is co-produced by the Tampa JCC & Federation and The Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties.


Benzion and Rachel Bulmash are shown above during a visit to the United States to see their son, Sam Bulmash, who now lives in Tampa. Benzion met Rachel in a Siberian labor camp after both fled from the Nazis. Benzion escaped from Trochenbrod, Poland (now part of Ukraine) before Germans killed nearly everyone there — about 5,000 Jews. “Lost Town,” a film about Trochenbrod, is part of the Film Festival. Sam will discuss the documentary after it is shown. 
Photo provided by Sam Bulmash Benzion and Rachel Bulmash are shown above during a visit to the United States to see their son, Sam Bulmash, who now lives in Tampa. Benzion met Rachel in a Siberian labor camp after both fled from the Nazis. Benzion escaped from Trochenbrod, Poland (now part of Ukraine) before Germans killed nearly everyone there — about 5,000 Jews. “Lost Town,” a film about Trochenbrod, is part of the Film Festival. Sam will discuss the documentary after it is shown. Photo provided by Sam Bulmash Lost Town will be shown on Monday, March 24 at 7 p.m. at Villagio

Cinemas of Carrollwood, and will include a discussion with South Tampa resident Sam Bulmash, whose father, Benzion Bulmash, was a teenager living in Trochenbrod when Germans took over the town. Benzion and a few other teens fled to Russia and survived the war, but Benzion’s father, brother, sister and almost 5,000 other Jews in that town and surrounding areas were killed by the Germans, Sam Bulmash said.


$8 at the Capitol. Available online and at the door. $8 at the Capitol. Available online and at the door. The Russians sent Benzion to a labor camp in Siberia, where he met and married Rachel (Rosa), who had escaped the Warsaw ghetto. When the war ended, the couple went to seek their families but found no survivors. They continued on to a Displaced People Camp in Germany, where Sam was born. The family then moved to Israel where his parents remained until their deaths and where a brother still lives.

In 2008, Sam Bulmash joined 75 others from all over the world, including the film’s producer, Jeremy Goldscheider, to visit the site of the former town. “We all met in Kiev and went from there in buses to the location of the empty fields and ruins and mass graves of what was left of this once vital and lively town of Trochenbrod,” he said. During the trip, Bulmash met the producer and also a woman who recalled going to school in Trochenbrod with Bulmash’s father.


Tickets are $8 at both venues, available online or at the door. Students and faculty with ID get free admission. Tickets are $8 at both venues, available online or at the door. Students and faculty with ID get free admission. “When you go there,” Bulmash said of his trip to Trochenbrod, “you find that there is nothing there. It was all destroyed by the Germans. All the places where there were streets and synagogues and shops – they were wiped out. All you see is fields. The idea of this documentary is to bring back the memory of those who lived there and to serve as evidence, as a reminder that these and all the others killed in the Holocaust are not just numbers and statistics, but to show this was a lively town full of about 5,000 people.”


Tickets are $6. Available online only. Tickets are $6. Available online only. Trochenbrod began in 1835 as a farming community. Bulmash said at the time the area was in Russia and the mother of a czar wanted to generate economic activity in that area so Jews were allowed to own land – something highly unusual in those days. From the Jewish farms, the town grew, populated almost entirely by Jews. Nearly all of them, along with other Jews from surrounding areas who were rounded up by Germans, were killed in mass executions in 1942.

Tickets for the showing of Lost Town are $8. In addition to the film discussion by Bulmash, in the café area of the cinema, a cinebistro menu is available.

Festival tickets for all movies may be purchased at www.TBJFF. org.


Tickets are $8. Available online or at the door. Tickets are $8. Available online or at the door. In addition to Lost Town, the films to be shown during the second week of the film festival are:

Tuesday, March 25, 7 p.m., Congregation Beth Israel, Sun City Center Thursday, March 27, 7:30 p.m., Capitol Theater, Clearwater.

Hunting Elephants

Patrick Stewart (Star Trek: The Next Generation) and an impressive cast of Israeli top talent give bravura comic turns in Hunting Elephants, a bank heist caper and coming-of-age tale from writerdirector Reshef Levi. At the bank where his father works, 12-yearold Jonathan watches helplessly as his father succumbs to a sudden heart attack while testing a new high-tech security system. The evil bank manager refuses to pay the father’s pension and the boy’s mom leaves him in the care of his cantankerous grandfather and mate, both former Zionist freedom fighters now barely existing in a nursing home. Guilt-ridden over his father’s death, and mortified when his mother begins dating the bank manager out of financial desperation, Jonathan and the aging misfits hatch a plot to rob the bank. Joining the misadventure is Jonathan’s great uncle, a disgraced British lord and frustrated actor (Stewart in a scene-stealing role).


Tickets are $36 for the brunch and film, $30 for brunch only or $8 for movie only and $6 for movie only for children under age 10. Available online only. Tickets are $36 for the brunch and film, $30 for brunch only or $8 for movie only and $6 for movie only for children under age 10. Available online only. Tickets are $6 at Beth Israel and

Wednesday, March 26, 7 p.m. USF Marshall Student Center, Tampa Monday, March 31, 7 p.m. Eckerd College, Miller Auditorium, St. Petersburg.


Tickets are $8. Available online or at the door. Tickets are $8. Available online or at the door. The Attack

By all appearances Palestinian Israeli surgeon Amin Jaafari (Ali Suliman) has it all. As a respected member of his profession, he has carved a space for himself and his wife Sihem at the crossroads of two troubled societies. They have strong friendships with Israelis, and are ostensibly the best examples of Palestinian integration. Despite some tension in the hospital, Jaafari is blissfully unaware of differences. But Jaafari’s world is shattered when Sihem goes missing after a suicide bombing and it appears she could be responsible. A stunned Jaafari is haunted by how he could have missed the signals. Evading the police and following his own intuition he travels alone to the Palestinian Territories to find those who might have recruited her, but by this time is unwelcome there and by Jews. In the end, the ordeal shatters Jaafari’s illusions, and when some of his Jewish co-workers suggest he pick up where he left off, he sees clearly their inability to understand how the other half lives.

Friday, March 28, 1 p.m., Villagio Cinemas at Carrollwood, Tampa.

The Other Son

What would you do if you discovered you had been switched at birth? That’s what happens to two teens, an Israeli and a Palestinian, forcing each of them to question their identities and leaving their families to figure out how to deal with the emotional repercussions. Director Lorraine Lévy doesn’t • CONTINUED from PREVIOUS PAGE take sides and instead focuses on the family relationships and the human side of this heartbreaking situation. How does a family react to the news that they raised the son of their adversary? How does a mother cope with the realization that her own son was raised by another woman? How do the fathers manage their emotions when they’ve been conditioned to be wary of the other side? How do the boys deal with being “the other son”?

Saturday, March 29, 8 p.m.,
AMC Veterans 24, Tampa.

Aftermath

Based on true events from a dark moment in Poland’s history, Aftermath is considered one of the most controversial and important films ever made in Poland. A year after its initial release, this film from award-winning director Wladyslaw Pasikowski is still causing shockwaves and soul-searching throughout Poland. The provocative thriller is set in motion when Franek returns from the United States to his native village in Poland and discovers his brother J–zek is hated by his fellow Catholic villagers. The danger escalates through broken windows, anonymous threats and police harassment. When J–zek is attacked for removing old Jewish tombstones that were used to pave the village roads, he finally reveals the reasons for the town’s hostility. What Franek discovers next is an ominous and terrifying secret that scarred his village for almost half a century. This movie was selected by the Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival Committee for its “Committee’s Choice” honor.

Sunday, March 30, 1 p.m., Westshore AMC 14, Tampa. “To Life, To Film” event with champagne brunch at Maggiano’s at 11 a.m., Westshore Plaza.

The Zigzag Kid

The son of the world’s greatest detective embarks on a rollicking adventure to solve the mystery of his true identity in The Zigzag Kid, a family-friendly, action-packed adaptation of the beloved book by Israeli writer David Grossman. Growing up without a mother, life is not easy for Dutch 13-year-old Nono Feierberg. Following in the footsteps of his super sleuth, workaholic father, Nono yearns to learn more about his mother’s mysterious fate. But the boy’s overactive imagination and mischievous stunts constantly get him into trouble. Sent away on the eve of his bar mitzvah to be set straight by his uncle, Nono meets his father’s nemesis, master jewel thief Felix Glick, who whisks him off on a secret mission and an encounter with a seductive nightclub chanteuse, played by Isabella Rossellini. With only 24 hours to go until his rite of passage, the race is on for Nono to put his detective skills to work and complete the high-stakes quest that will change his life forever.

Sunday, March 30, 3:30 p.m., Westshore AMC 14, Tampa.

Ida

Bestowed with countless accolades on the international film festival circuit, Ida is an exploration of personal and national reckoning as told through the story of a young novitiate nun in early 1960s Communist Poland. The angel-faced Anna is on the brink of taking her vows when the Mother Superior insists she make contact with her only living relative. Venturing from the rural convent to Warsaw, the emotionally remote Anna is met by her boozy, free-living aunt Wanda, an embittered ex-prosecutor of so-called enemies of the state. An offhand revelation about Anna’s true identity sets in motion a road trip through the Polish countryside during which these two strikingly different characters confront family secrets and postwar demons. Using austere black-and-white imagery, director Pawel Pawlikowski has artfully crafted a cathartic journey of self-discovery.

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